Oil Freedom through Solar Energy

  • A massive switch from coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear power plants to solar power plants could supply 69 percent of the U.S.’s electricity and 35 percent of its total energy by 2050.
  • A vast area of photovoltaic cells would have to be erected in the Southwest. Excess daytime energy would be stored as compressed air in underground caverns to be tapped during nighttime hours.
  • Large solar concentrator power plants would be built as well.
  • A new direct-current power transmission backbone would deliver solar electricity across the country.
  • But $420 billion in subsidies from 2011 to 2050 would be required to fund the infrastructure and make it cost-competitive. {That is equivalent to 1 year of military expenditures}

High prices for gasoline and home heating oil are here to stay. The U.S. is at war in the Middle East at least in part to protect its foreign oil interests. And as China, India and other nations rapidly increase their demand for fossil fuels, future fighting over energy looms large. In the meantime, power plants that burn coal, oil and natural gas, as well as vehicles everywhere, continue to pour millions of tons of pollutants and greenhouse gases into the atmosphere annually, threatening the planet.

Well-meaning scientists, engineers, economists and politicians have proposed various steps that could slightly reduce fossil-fuel use and emissions. These steps are not enough. The U.S. needs a bold plan to free itself from fossil fuels. Our analysis convinces us that a massive switch to solar power is the logical answer.

Solar energy’s potential is off the chart. The energy in sunlight striking the earth for 40 minutes is equivalent to global energy consumption for a year. The U.S. is lucky to be endowed with a vast resource; at least 250,000 square miles of land in the Southwest alone are suitable for constructing solar power plants, and that land receives more than 4,500 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of solar radiation a year. Converting only 2.5 percent of that radiation into electricity would match the nation’s total energy consumption in 2006.

To convert the country to solar power, huge tracts of land would have to be covered with photovoltaic panels and solar heating troughs. A direct-current (DC) transmission backbone would also have to be erected to send that energy efficiently across the nation.


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2 comments:

  RK

July 27, 2008 at 2:26 PM

you have mentioned every aspect of how solar energy would be beneficial,can u tel us please how we would be able to efficieltly mak use of solar energy cause i have few points of concern...
1. erecting photovoltaic panels and then trapping energy for commercial use would mak the capital investment go in billions.
2.Talk about india.How much potential do we hold..u have showed diff figures copied from somwhre..
do u hav somthn that can help us..

Would lik to discuss ova many thngs.Only if ths forum gets som response.

  David

July 28, 2008 at 4:23 AM

Dear RK,

Given that you blog about renewable energy, I would hope you would be interested in the newly reprinted Complete Biogas Handbook, which has been given strong favorable reviews by Mother Earth News, J. Baldwin, et al. See the website for full information and downloads of selected chapters and appendices.

d.
--
David William House
"The Complete Biogas Handbook" www.completebiogas.com